Flower's Cove Town Council



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Flower's Island Light House

The lighthouse provides a unique history to the town of Flowers Cove.



History of Flower's Cove: First Settlers

Flower's Cove was originally called French Island Harbour since it was a harbour for many French fishing ships in the early 1800s. It was the excellent cod fishing grounds and the spring seal migration that first brought settlers to this community. The French stayed until around 1850, when the families of Henry Whalen and John Carnell from Catalina arrived. No French fishing was reported after 1870. Other families from settlements in Trinity and Conception Bay migrated to the area. Shortly after that time Michael Lawless and Thomas Sinclair arrived in the Straits en route to Labrador. They were on a sealing vessel that was stuck in the Straits due to heavy ice. Their supplies were running low, and since they had a crew of men on company board, Lawless and Sinclair decided to walk ashore to Anchor Point. There they sought employment and worked for a William Genge for three winters. Then they decided to relocate to French Island Harbour.

The fishing related industry caused an increase in the population and thus the economy. In early 1900 Flower’s Cove became the main business community for the region. Four Genge brothers (Isaac, Angus, Charlie and James) from Deadmans Cove moved to the community and started a business related to the fishery. Their cousins Israel and Henry Genge had also started a business in Flower’s Cove. Around this time the Grenfell Mission had also started a Co-Operative.

In the many years to follow, Flower’s Cove became the head- quarters for many services for the whole area such as Social Services, RCMP, Scotia Bank and many others. These services became a boost to the economy, but in early 1970, the fishing became a more important industry with the opening of the fish plant by the Provincial Government.



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